Cryoablation is a process that uses extreme cold (cryo) to remove tissue (ablation).

Cryoablation is used in a variety of clinical applications using hollow needles (cryoprobes) through which cooled, thermally conductive, fluids are circulated. Cryoprobes are inserted into or placed adjacent to tissue which is determined to be diseased in such a way that ablation will provide correction yielding benefit to the patient. When the probes are in place, the cryogenic freezing unit removes heat ("cools") from the tip of the probe and by extension from the surrounding tissues.

Ablation occurs in tissue that has been frozen by at least three mechanisms: (1) formation of ice crystals within cells thereby disrupting membranes, and interrupting cellular metabolism among other processes; (2) coagulation of blood thereby interrupting bloodflow to the tissue in turn causing ischemia and cell death; and (3) induction of , the so-called programmed cell death cascade.

What is Cryotherapy?
Cryotherapy, also called cryosurgery, cryoablation or targeted cryoablation therapy, refers to the application of extreme cold to destroy diseased tissue, including cancer cells. Cryotherapy is used to destroy skin tumors, precancerous skin moles, nodules, skin tags or unsightly freckles. With the improvement of imaging techniques and the development of devices to better control extreme temperatures, Karmanos Cancer Center physicians use cryotherapy as a treatment for patients with breast cancer as well as other forms of cancer.













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